British Sports Hall of Fame 1924

My four inductees to the British Hall of Fame for 1924 are:

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Harold Abrahams (Athletics) – The Olympic 100m champion of 1924 where he also won a silver medal in the sprint relay.  At those Games he set British records in heat, semi-final and final.  In 1923 and 1924 he set four British records at long jump and the last of those marks (7.38m) remained the British record for thirty years.  He won a record eight individual events for Cambridge against Oxford in his university career.  His story was later made famous in the film Chariots of Fire.

Bob Crompton (Football) Embed from Getty Images

The greatest right-back of his era in England.  He played 41 times for England from 1902 to 1914, captaining them 22 times.  This remained the record number of England appearances until 1952.  He joined Blackburn Rovers in 1896 and stayed with the club until he retired from playing in 1920, at the time a record span playing for one club.  In that time he won two league titles and represented the English league 17 times in matches.  He went on to manage Blackburn to an FA Cup win.

Harry Foster (Rackets) – one of the greatest rackets players of all-time.  From 1894 he won seven consecutive Amateur Singles titles and won an eighth in 1904.  He also won the Amateur doubles title seven times between 1894 and 1903 in his decade of dominating the sport.  He was also a successful cricketer with Worcestershire for over twenty years.

Lucy Morton (Swimming) – the first British woman to win an individual Olympic swimming title when she took the 200m breaststroke gold in the 1924 Games (see photo).  Before breaststroke was included in the Games she set world records at 220 yards in 1916 and 1920 and also one in the 150 yards backstroke in 1916.

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